Sweet Dreams

Having a good night's sleep takes more than just a bedtime.

Tag: Sleepys (page 1 of 4)

A Blueberry Breakfast for the Busy Bee

Between busy work schedules and summer outings on the weekends, laboring over healthy and tasty meals is the last thing on our minds. That’s why having an arsenal of quick and easy recipes are perfect for the gal or guy on the go! Today, we’ll be sharing our favorite blueberry breakfast recipe. Ready to get cooking? Us, too…

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Cue the Fireworks – We’re Grilling up Shrimp for the 4th

Fire up the grill! That’s right, it’s barbecue time. Independence Day is right around the corner and we’re helping you prep for the perfect July 4th BBQ with three grilled shrimp recipes that are sure to please (and help you fall asleep when the festivities are over!). So grab the red-and-white checkered tablecloth, put on your chef’s hat and let’s get grillin’!

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Join New York’s Biggest Pillow Fight!

Oh hi there! We’ve been looking for you.

Calling All Pillow Fighters!

We hope you’re ready to join in on the fun at the 11th Annual NYC Pillow Fight being held on April 2nd from 3-6 p.m. at Washington Square Park. The event takes place worldwide and draws thousands of people. This year, Sleepy’s will be the official pillow provider of the NYC location, our stores will be selling pillows to benefit Dare2B, a charity that works to eliminate child poverty and homelessness in New York City.

What exactly does this mean?

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Perfect Pillows for Him and Her

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and let’s face it… chocolate and roses are a little overrated. But, don’t worry, we’ve found the perfect Valentine’s Day presents for you and your loved one.


Tossing & turning at night, and feeling super tired in the morning? Do you feel like you’re getting a good night’s sleep, but your body is achy and sore when you wake up? These could be signs that you don’t have the right pillow for your perfect night’s rest.

The right pillow can really make all the difference between an energized morning and a difficult start to your day. So, lets get to it, shall we? Here are some of our favorite pillows that you need to check out:

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Be Smart About Sleep

Small changes to your habits and lifestyle can have a big effect on sleep.


You might have heard some women talk about their biological clocks in regards to fertility; all living creatures have another type of internal clock, called the circadian rhythm. It refers to the 24-hour cycle of activity and sleep affected by the change from light to dark. A part of the brain called the hypothalamus manages the circadian rhythm, or pattern, by processing information (like when your eyes detect light) and creating sleep patterns. This sleep-wake cycle gives you the cue to go to sleep.

If you have trouble with sleep and insomnia, slightly adjusting your routine and habits may help.

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How High Blood Sugar Steals Sleep Time

amerisleep diabetes and sleep

It’s probably far from obvious, but your diabetes could be the reason that you’re having trouble sleeping.

Type 2 diabetes affects nearly 30 million Americans—and the numbers are growing. Though most of us are aware that the disease has a serious impact on a person’s diet and blood sugar, fewer are familiar with the many related health woes that diabetes can cause—and how they can negatively impact sleep.

Take a closer look at the surprisingly intricate relationship between diabetes and sleep—plus how people with the condition can get a better night’s rest.

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7 Fitness Experts Share Tips on Balancing Exercise and Sleep for Better Health

7 Fitness Experts Share Tips on Balancing Exercise and Sleep for Better Health

When people think about fitness and getting in shape, the most common focuses are usually exercise and diet. We know that burning calories and eating right contribute to a better body, but what about rest?

Mounting evidence shows that sleep is a vital component of fitness as well, important not only for energy, but also for keeping muscles healthy and hormones balanced.

Research from Stanford found improved athletic performance when their basketball team slept more, and a Northwestern University study also found that people exercised longer on days following good sleep. Several studies also associate too little sleep with higher body fat and greater risk of obesity.

But not only does sleep boost your workouts and possibly weight loss, getting regular exercise also benefits your sleep quality, creating a symbiotic and complementary relationship.

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13 Easy to Prepare Sleep-Inducing Dinners

15 Easy to Prepare Sleep-Inducing Dinners

Advice for better sleep typically focuses on evening habits like limiting electronics and keeping bedrooms comfortable, but there’s one important aspect you might be overlooking.

Dinner. You’ve heard that you are what you eat, but what you eat may also affect how you sleep.

Certain nutrients are required by the body to carry out daily functions, including making hormones and neurotransmitters related to rest. Other foods can impact physical comfort, affecting slumber by boosting your heart rate or causing indigestion.

The more we learn, the more significant nutrition’s role in sleep appears to be. Read on to see how diet and rest connect and what to eat at night to nourish your body for more efficient sleep.


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The Best Sleep Position for Your Body

Your p.m. pose can affect a lot more than just your slumber.

Your sleeping pose can have a major impact on your slumber—as well as your overall health. Poor p.m. posture could potentially cause back and neck pain, fatigue, sleep apnea, muscle cramping, impaired circulation, headaches, heartburn, tummy troubles, and even premature wrinkles. Wondering which sleep spot is best? Check out the rankings, below, from best to worst.


1. On Your Back

Though it’s not the most popular position—only eight percent of people sleep on their backs—it’s still the best. By far the healthiest option for most people, sleeping on your back allows your head, neck, and spine to rest in a neutral position. This means that there’s no extra pressure on those areas, so you’re less likely to experience pain. Sleeping facing the ceiling also ideal for warding off acid reflux. Just be sure to use a pillow that elevates and supports your head enough—you want your stomach to be below your esophagus to prevent food or acid from coming up your digestive tract. However, snoozing on your back can cause the tongue to block the breathing tube, making it a dangerous position for those who suffer from sleep apnea (a condition that causes periods of breathlessness). This position can also make snoring more severe.

2. On Your Side

This position (where your torso and legs are relatively straight) also helps decrease acid reflux, and since your spine is elongated, it wards off back and neck pain. Plus, you’re less likely to snore in this snooze posture, because it keeps airways open. For that reason, it’s also the best choice for those with sleep apnea. Fifteen percent of adult choose to sleep on their side, but there’s one downside: It can lead to wrinkles, because half of your face pushes against a pillow.

3. In the Fetal Position

With 41 percent of adults choosing this option, it’s the most popular sleep position. A loose, fetal position (where you’re on your side and your torso is hunched and your knees are bent)—especially on your left side—is great if you’re pregnant. That’s because it improves circulation in your body and in the fetus, and it prevents your uterus from pressing against your liver, which is on your right side. This pose is also good for snorers. But resting in a fetal position that’s curled up too tightly can restrict breathing in your diaphragm. And it can leave you feeling a bit sore in the morning, particularly if you have arthritis in your joints or back. Prevent these woes by straightening out your body as much as you can, instead of tucking your chin into your chest and pulling your knees up high. You can also reduce strain on your hips by placing a pillow between your knees.

4. On Your Stomach

While this is good for easing snoring, it’s bad for practically everything else. Seven percent of adults pick this pose, but it can lead to back and neck pain, since it’s hard to keep your spine in a neutral position. Plus, stomach sleepers put pressure on their muscles and joints, possibly leading to numbness, tingling, aches, and irritated nerves. It’s best to try to choose another position, but if you must sleep on your stomach, try lying facedown to keep upper airways open—instead of with your head turned to one side—with your forehead propped up on a pillow to allow room to breathe.

This article was originally published on Sleep.org. You can read the entire post, here.

How to Be Productive on Low or No Sleep

Follow these five rules to stay productive when you’re running on empty.

Sure, there’s no replacement for a good seven to nine hours of sleep a night. But sometimes, well, life interferes. When you’re running on fumes—either because you just stayed up too late or because sleep problems are keeping you up—there are simple ways to maximize your productivity until you can start to repay that sleep debt and get back on track.

Get Some Sun. Sunshine (or bright light, in a pinch) helps to remind your brain that it’s daytime and you should be awake—even if you’re exhausted. That’s because light triggers your internal clock to stop producing melatonin, a hormone that makes you feel sleepy at night.
  1. Move Your Body. It may sound counterintuitive when you’re already dragging, but expending energy through exercise (or even a quick jog up a flight of stairs) increases blood flow and pumps up your rate of breathing. It sends more energizing oxygen throughout your body so you feel as much as 65 percent less fatigued.
  1. Drink Up. Water, that is. While drinking more than you need won’t necessarily increase your energy levels, being even mildly dehydrated can put a damper on your mood and leave you feeling worse than you already do. And if you find yourself running to the bathroom more often, the extra activity can only help!
  1. Take a Nap. No, napping is not a sign of weakness. It can be the secret to better performance. NASA pilots who averaged a 26-minute nap on a cross-ocean flight had 34 percent better performance than their non-napping colleagues. Just don’t snooze too long or you’ll run the risk of waking up even more bleary-eyed. If you drink coffee, consider this trick: Since it takes about half an hour for caffeine to work its magic, sip your cup of Joe just before your nap to wake up refreshed.
  1. Don’t Multitask. It’s unfortunate but true: When you’re under-slept, your brain simply doesn’t fire on all cylinders. You have less working memory and you recover more slowly from distractions. So keep it simple. Close extra Internet windows (including e-mail), silence your phone, and shut off those distracting yet oh-so-interesting podcasts for an extended period so you can focus on one task at a time.

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